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Configuration

Stylelint expects a configuration object.

Stylelint uses cosmiconfig to find and load your configuration object. Starting from the current working directory, it looks for the following possible sources:

  • a stylelint property in package.json
  • a .stylelintrc file
  • a stylelint.config.js file exporting a JS object
  • a stylelint.config.cjs file exporting a JS object. When running Stylelint in JavaScript packages that specify "type":"module" in their package.json

The search stops when one of these is found, and Stylelint uses that object. You can use the --config or configFile option to short-circuit the search.

The .stylelintrc file (without extension) can be in JSON or YAML format. You can add a filename extension to help your text editor provide syntax checking and highlighting:

  • .stylelintrc.json
  • .stylelintrc.yaml / .stylelintrc.yml
  • .stylelintrc.js

The configuration object has the following properties:

rules

Rules determine what the linter looks for and complains about. There are over 170 rules built into Stylelint.

No rules are turned on by default and there are no default values. You must explicitly configure each rule to turn it on.

The rules property is an object whose keys are rule names and values are rule configurations. For example:

{
"rules": {
"color-no-invalid-hex": true
}
}

Each rule configuration fits one of the following formats:

  • null (to turn the rule off)
  • a single value (the primary option)
  • an array with two values ([primary option, secondary options])

Specifying a primary option turns on a rule.

Many rules provide secondary options for further customization. To set secondary options, use a two-member array. For example:

{
"rules": {
"selector-pseudo-class-no-unknown": [
true,
{
"ignorePseudoClasses": ["global"]
}
]
}
}

You can add any number of keys in the object. For example, you can:

  • turn off block-no-empty
  • turn on comment-empty-line-before with a primary and secondary option
  • turn on max-empty-lines and unit-allowed-list with primary options
{
"rules": {
"block-no-empty": null,
"comment-empty-line-before": [
"always",
{
"ignore": ["stylelint-commands", "after-comment"]
}
],
"max-empty-lines": 2,
"unit-allowed-list": ["em", "rem", "%", "s"]
}
}

disableFix

You can set the disableFix secondary option to disable autofix on a per rule basis.

For example:

{
"rules": {
"indentation": [
2,
{
"except": ["value"],
"disableFix": true
}
]
}
}

message

You can use the message secondary option to deliver a custom message when a rule is violated.

For example, the following rule configuration would substitute in custom messages:

{
"rules": {
"color-hex-case": [
"lower",
{
"message": "Lowercase letters are easier to distinguish from numbers"
}
],
"indentation": [
2,
{
"except": ["block"],
"message": "Please use 2 spaces for indentation.",
"severity": "warning"
}
]
}
}

Alternately, you can write a custom formatter for maximum control if you need serious customization.

reportDisables

You can set the reportDisables secondary option to report any stylelint-disable comments for this rule, effectively disallowing authors to opt out of it.

For example:

{
"rules": {
"indentation": [
2,
{
"except": ["value"],
"reportDisables": true
}
]
}
}

The report is considered to be a lint error.

severity

You can use the severity secondary option to adjust any specific rule's severity.

The available values for severity are:

  • "warning"
  • "error" (default)

For example:

{
"rules": {
"indentation": [
2,
{
"except": ["value"],
"severity": "warning"
}
]
}
}

Reporters may use these severity levels to display problems or exit the process differently.

extends

You can extend an existing configuration (whether your own or a third-party one).

Popular configurations include:

You'll find more in awesome stylelint.

When one configuration extends another, it starts with the other's properties then adds to and overrides what's there.

For example, you can extend the stylelint-config-standard and then change the indentation to tabs and turn off the number-leading-zero rule:

{
"extends": "stylelint-config-standard",
"rules": {
"indentation": "tab",
"number-leading-zero": null
}
}

You can extend an array of existing configurations, with each item in the array taking precedence over the previous item (so the second item overrides rules in the first, the third item overrides rules in the first and the second, and so on, the last item overrides everything else).

For example, with stylelint-config-standard, then layer myExtendableConfig on top of that, and then override the indentation rule:

{
"extends": ["stylelint-config-standard", "./myExtendableConfig"],
"rules": {
"indentation": "tab"
}
}

The value of "extends" is a "locater" (or an array of "locaters") that is ultimately require()d. It can fit whatever format works with Node's require.resolve() algorithm. That means a "locater" can be:

  • the name of a module in node_modules (e.g. stylelint-config-standard; that module's main file must be a valid JSON configuration)
  • an absolute path to a file (which makes sense if you're creating a JS object in a Node.js context and passing it in) with a .js or .json extension.
  • a relative path to a file with a .js or .json extension, relative to the referencing configuration (e.g. if configA has extends: "../configB", we'll look for configB relative to configA).

plugins

Plugins are rules or sets of rules built by the community that support methodologies, toolsets, non-standard CSS features, or very specific use cases.

Popular plugin packs include:

  • stylelint-order - specify the ordering of things, e.g. properties within declaration blocks
  • stylelint-scss - enforce a wide variety of linting rules for SCSS-like syntax

You'll find more in awesome stylelint.

To use one, add a "plugins" array to your config, containing "locaters" identifying the plugins you want to use. As with extends, above, a "locater" can be either a:

  • npm module name
  • absolute path
  • path relative to the invoking configuration file

Once the plugin is declared, within your "rules" object you'll need to add options for the plugin's rule(s), just like any standard rule. Look at the plugin's documentation to know what the rule name should be.

{
"plugins": ["../special-rule.js"],
"rules": {
"plugin-namespace/special-rule": "everything"
}
}

A "plugin" can provide a single rule or a set of rules. If the plugin you use provides a set, invoke the module in your "plugins" configuration value, and use the rules it provides in "rules". For example:

{
"plugins": ["../some-rule-set.js"],
"rules": {
"some-rule-set/first-rule": "everything",
"some-rule-set/second-rule": "nothing",
"some-rule-set/third-rule": "everything"
}
}

customSyntax

Specify a custom syntax to use on your code. More info.

overrides

You can provide configurations under the overrides key that will only apply to files that match specific glob patterns, using the same format you would pass on the command line (e.g., app/**/*.test.css).

It is possible to override settings based on file glob patterns in your configuration by using the overrides key. An example of using the overrides key is as follows:

In your .stylelintrc.json:

{
"rules": {
"string-quotes": "double"
},

"overrides": [
{
"files": ["components/**/*.css", "pages/**/*.css"],
"rules": {
"string-quotes": "single"
}
}
]
}

Here is how overrides work in a configuration file:

  • The patterns are applied against the file path relative to the directory of the config file. For example, if your config file has the path /Users/person/workspace/any-project/.stylelintrc.js and the file you want to lint has the path /Users/person/workspace/any-project/components/card.css, then the pattern provided in .stylelintrc.js will be executed against the relative path components/card.css.
  • Glob pattern overrides have higher precedence than the regular configuration in the same config file. Multiple overrides within the same config are applied in order. That is, the last override block in a config file always has the highest precedence.
  • A glob specific configuration works almost the same as any other Stylelint config. Override blocks can contain any configuration options that are valid in a regular config.
  • Multiple glob patterns can be provided within a single override block. A file must match at least one of the supplied patterns for the configuration to apply.

defaultSeverity

You can set the default severity level for all rules that do not have a severity specified in their secondary options. For example, you can set the default severity to "warning":

{
"defaultSeverity": "warning"
}

reportDescriptionlessDisables

Report stylelint-disable comments without a description. A report* property property.

For example:

{
"reportDescriptionlessDisables": true
}

More info.

reportInvalidScopeDisables

Report stylelint-disable comments that don't match rules that are specified in the configuration object. A report* property property.

For example:

{
"reportInvalidScopeDisables": true
}

More info.

reportNeedlessDisables

Report stylelint-disable comments that don't actually match any lints that need to be disabled. A report* property property.

For example:

{
"reportNeedlessDisables": true
}

More info.

ignoreDisables

Ignore stylelint-disable (e.g. /* stylelint-disable block-no-empty */) comments.

For example:

{
"ignoreDisables": true
}

More info.

ignoreFiles

You can provide a glob or array of globs to ignore specific files.

For example, you can ignore all JavaScript files:

{
"ignoreFiles": ["**/*.js"]
}

Stylelint ignores the node_modules directory by default. However, this is overridden if ignoreFiles is set.

If the globs are absolute paths, they are used as is. If they are relative, they are analyzed relative to

  • configBasedir, if it's provided;
  • the config's filepath, if the config is a file that Stylelint found a loaded;
  • or process.cwd().

Note that this is not an efficient method for ignoring lots of files. If you want to ignore a lot of files efficiently, use .stylelintignore or adjust your files globs.

processors

Processors are functions built by the community that hook into Stylelint's pipeline, modifying code on its way into Stylelint and modifying results on their way out.

We discourage their use in favor of using the customSyntax option as processors are incompatible with the autofix feature.

To use one, add a "processors" array to your config, containing "locaters" identifying the processors you want to use. As with extends, above, a "locater" can be either an npm module name, an absolute path, or a path relative to the invoking configuration file.

{
"processors": ["stylelint-my-processor"],
"rules": {}
}

If your processor has options, make that item an array whose first item is the "locator" and second item is the options object.

{
"processors": [
"stylelint-my-processor",
["some-other-processor", { "optionOne": true, "optionTwo": false }]
],
"rules": {}
}

Processors can also only be used with the CLI and the Node.js API, not with the PostCSS plugin. (The PostCSS plugin ignores them.)

report* properties

These properties provide extra validation for stylelint-disable comments. This can be helpful for enforcing useful and well-documented disables.

The available reports are:

They are configured like rules. They can have one of three values:

  • null (to turn the configuration off)
  • true or false (the primary option)
  • an array with two values ([primary option, secondary options])

The following secondary options are available:

  • "except" takes an array of rule names for which the primary option should be inverted.
  • "severity" adjusts the level of error emitted for the rule, as above.

For example, this produces errors for needless disables of all rules except selector-max-type:

{
"reportNeedlessDisables": [true, { "except": ["selector-max-type"] }]
}

And this emits warnings for disables of color-hex-case that don't have a description:

{
"reportDescriptionlessDisables": [
false,
{
"except": ["color-hex-case"],
"severity": "warning"
}
]
}